Opportunity Zones by Location

List of Opportunity Zones by State

There are 8,764 opportunity zones in the United States. Here is the breakdown by state. U.S. overseas territories and Washington DC are also included.

Location Designated Opportunity Zones Low-Income Tracts Non-LIC Contiguous Tracts
Alabama 158 153 5
Alaska 25 25 0
American Samoa 16 16 0
Arizona 168 160 8
Arkansas 85 83 2
California 879 871 8
Colorado 126 119 7
Connecticut 72 71 1
Delaware 25 24 1
Florida 427 427 0
Georgia 260 260 0
Guam 25 23 2
Hawaii 25 23 2
Idaho 28 26 2
Illinois 327 327 0
Indiana 156 153 3
Iowa 62 61 1
Kansas 74 70 4
Kentucky 144 139 5
Louisiana 150 145 5
Maine 32 30 2
Maryland 149 145 4
Massachusetts 138 137 1
Michigan 288 283 5
Minnesota 128 127 1
Mississippi 100 95 5
Missouri 161 153 8
Montana 25 25 0
Nebraska 44 43 1
Nevada 61 60 1
New Hampshire 27 27 0
New Jersey 169 169 0
New Mexico 63 59 4
New York 514 497 17
North Carolina 252 241 11
North Dakota 25 25 0
Northern Mariana Islands 20 20 0
Ohio 320 317 3
Oklahoma 117 114 3
Oregon 86 81 5
Pennsylvania 300 289 11
Puerto Rico 863 837 26
Rhode Island 25 25 0
South Carolina 135 128 7
South Dakota 25 23 2
Tennessee 176 170 6
Texas 628 628 0
Utah 46 46 0
Vermont 25 23 2
Virgin Islands 14 13 1
Virginia 212 207 5
Washington 139 132 7
Washington DC 25 25 0
West Virginia 55 52 3
Wisconsin 120 120 0
Wyoming 25 24 1

Map of Opportunity Zones

Map created by OpportunityDb.com

Opportunity Zones Analysis

Number of Opportunity Zones

States and U.S. overseas possessions were able to designate up to 25 percent of eligible census tracts as opportunity zones. Therefore, the number of opportunity zones in each state is highly correlated with the total population of the state. This explains why California, Texas, New York, Florida, and Illinois are among the states with the most opportunity zones, together accounting for nearly one-third of the total.

Puerto Rico is the outlier; their count of 863 opportunity zones is second only to California’s 879. Because of the extensive hurricane damage from 2017, Puerto Rico was granted special status that allowed them to nominate all of their low-income census tracts as opportunity zones. As such, nearly every tract on the island is an opportunity zone.

States and overseas possessions with fewer than 100 eligible census tracts were able to nominate up to 25 opportunity zones. Alaska, Delaware, Guam, Hawaii, Montana, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington DC, and Wyoming all took advantage of this rule, explaining why each of these locations has exactly 25 opportunity zones. Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, and Virgin Islands have fewer than 25 eligible tracts.

Number of Opportunity Zones by State

Median Household Income

Because only low-income census tracts and certain tracts contiguous with low-income tracts were eligible for opportunity zone nomination, the median household income of all of a state’s opportunity zones is always lower than the statewide average. Certain states have higher levels of income disparity between opportunity zones and their statewide average than others.

In places like Connecticut, Washington DC, and Illinois, the median household income in opportunity zones is 50 percent or less than the statewide average. Conversely, in places like New Mexico, Mississippi, and West Virginia, there is a much lower level of income disparity; median household income in the opportunity zones of these states is greater than 75 percent of the statewide average.

Opportunity Zones Median Household Income as Percentage of Statewide Average

Rural vs. Urban

Some states are more rural than others. The slope of the lines in the chart below illustrate how some states focused on nominating opportunity zones from rural or urban areas of the state. While most states nominated a slightly higher percentage of rural opportunity zones vs. their statewide averages, there are some outliers.

States like Idaho, New Hampshire, Colorado, and Georgia focused on nominating rural areas as opportunity zones (large positive slope on the chart below). Other states like North Dakota, Indiana, Ohio, and Connecticut focused on nominating urban areas as opportunity zones (negative slope on the chart below).

Rural Census Tracts Statewide vs. Opportunity Zones

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